Sunday, 14 October 2012

Classifier + Thing Vs Compound Noun

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 320):
A sequence of Classifier + Thing may be so closely bonded that it is very like a single compound noun, especially where the Thing is a noun of a very general class … In such sequences the Classifier often carries the tonic prominence, which makes it sound like the first element in a compound noun. … the line between a compound noun and a nominal group consisting of Classifier + Thing is very fuzzy and shifting, which is why people are often uncertain how to write such sequences, whether as one word, as two words, or joined by a hyphen …

Classifier: Range Of Semantic Relations

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 320):
The range of semantic relations that may be embodied in a set of items functioning as Classifier is very broad; it includes material, scale and scope, purpose and function, status and rank, origin, mode of operation — more or less any feature that may serve to classify a set of things into a system of smaller sets …

Classifier Vs Epithet: Reflections In The Grammar [Diagnostic]

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 320):
Classifiers do not accept degrees of comparison or intensity … and they tend to be organised in mutually exclusive and exhaustive sets …

Classifier: Function

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 319):
The Classifier indicates a particular subclass of the thing in question … Sometimes the same word may function either as Epithet or as Classifier, with a difference in meaning …