Monday, 23 April 2012

Default: Realisation


Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 272):
Default circumstantials have the sense of negative condition — ‘if not, unless’; they are expressed by prepositional phrases with the complex prepositions in the absence of, in default of

Concession: Realisation


Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 272):
Concession circumstantials construe frustrated cause, with the sense of ‘although’; they are expressed by prepositional phrases with the prepositions despite, notwithstanding, or the complex prepositions in spite of or regardless of

Condition: Realisation

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 272):
… the Head/Thing of a nominal group introduced by the preposition tends to be
a noun denoting an entity whose existence is conditional …
a noun denoting an event that might eventuate … or
a nominalisation denoting a reified process or quality …
Eventive nouns include those naming meteorological processes …

Condition: Realisation


Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 271):
Circumstantials of Condition construe circumstances that have to obtain in order for the process to be actualised; they have the sense of ‘if’.  They are expressed by prepositional phrases with complex prepositions in case of, in the event of, on condition of

Contingency: Condition, Concession & Default

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 271):
Circumstances of Contingency specify an element on which the actualisation of the process depends. Again, there are three sub-types: Condition, Concession, Default.