Tuesday, 10 April 2012

Possessive Identifying Clauses: Possession As Process

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 246):
Some verbs combine the feature of possession with other semantic features; for example
exclude ‘[negative] + have’,
owe ‘have on behalf of another possessor’,
deserve ‘ought to have’,
lack ‘need to have’. 
(Most verbs meaning ‘come to have’, on the other hand, function as Process in ‘material’ clauses; for example get, receive, acquire.)

Possessive Identifying Clauses: Possession As Process

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 246):
In addition to possession in the usual sense of ‘owning’, this category includes abstract relationships of containment, involvement and the like.  Among the verbs commonly occurring in this function are include, involve, contain, comprise, consist of, provide.

Possessive Identifying Clauses: Possession As Process

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 246):
Here the possession is encoded as a process, typically realised by the verb ownhave is not used as an identifying verb of possession.

Possessive Identifying Clauses: Possession As (Both) Participants

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 246):
Here the participants embody the notion of possession, one signifying property of the possessor … the other signifying the thing possessed … Thus in the piano is Peter’s, both the piano and Peter’s express ‘that which Peter possesses’, the relationship between them being simply one of identity.

Possessive Identifying Clauses

Halliday & Matthiessen (2004: 246, 247):
In the ‘identifying’ mode, the possession takes the form of a relationship between two entities; and again this may be organised in two ways, with the relationship being expressed either
(a) as a feature of the participants … or
(b) as a feature of the process
As expected, types (a) and (b) are both reversible …